Seriously, this is a thing – startup casual which is replacing business casual as the trendy office attire.  Here it is from Entrepreneur:

The whole trend has become so popular, among founders as well as employees, that it has a name: startup casual.

All of you who are  slave to fashion are probably wondering what is the proper attire to achieve startup casual.  I suppose if you have to ask….  I did find myself aligning with this tidbit from the article:

Mark Zuckerberg claims that he wears the same jeans and gray T-shirt every day so he doesn’t expend any unnecessary mental energy on a decision that doesn’t matter.

That quote continues on to discuss decision-fatigue which I will studiously avoid as it sounds ridiculous even to a psychology major such as myself.  Zuckerberg still makes a valid point in that he doesn’t waste mental energy on trivial topics.  This approach is inline with Albert Einstein who apparently did not know his own phone number.  His point was to not waste mental resources on something that could easily be looked up in a phone book.

Brilliant, and I couldn’t agree more.  I am convinced that certain leadership styles get bogged down by the tactical side of leadership – time-sucking logistics, details bordering on minutiae and creativity-stifling routines.

Productivity is the new peak measurement for employees. This approach has always been the truest measure for successful selling.  It seems it is spreading throughout organizations today.

“Life is less formal; the concept of ‘going to the office’ has fundamentally changed; American companies are now more results-oriented than process-oriented.”

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Those aren’t my words but rather the findings from a Selling Power survey.  From the article:

A recent Selling Power online survey found that 29 percent of sales leaders judged their CEO useless when it comes to creating a sale.

Almost one third and I think I have worked for all of them!  The savvy sales CEO is a rare bird indeed.  Of course there is more to the article than just this survey.  The author focuses on the customer experience as seen through your salesperson representing your company in the market.  This representation is critical in making a successful sales hire – you have to envision the salesperson selling for your company.  Will they represent your company well?  Do they convey the right image, manners, professionalism?  These are not trifle matters when dealing with sales.

The same can be said for you CEOs.  The company’s culture flows from the CEO downward into the entire team.  CEOs who undervalue sales often struggle with teams that follow suit.  I’ve seen these companies first-hand…they have an engineering culture, a finance culture, a manufacturing culture…everything except a sales culture (which I would argue is the most important of them all).

I leave you with a prime example from the article:

A CEO whose company credo states, "We believe in candor and open communications" complained about how hard it is to communicate with salespeople. He said, "I can’t rely on their forecasts, I can’t rely on their data in our CRM system, and I can’t make strategic decisions based on their input." What happens when the CEO responds to salespeople with doubt or skepticism? The CEO’s doubt impacts the salesperson’s experience with the company, which inevitably echoes back to the customer.